Physical Apple TV: What explains the nostalgia for ’80s aerobic dance?

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Rose Byrne in Physical, 2021.Courtesy of Apple TV +

Hamilton says she intended to capture the humor of those workouts with regards to the choreography itself, doubling the exaggerated movements of the hips. There is a lightness in the movement of the time, a “smoother, smoother” energy that has a much lower impact than most modern workouts. “In the 1980s the movement was really sexual and free,” says Hamilton.

From a purely physical point of view, aerobic dance workouts are moderately beneficial. Your heart rate will go up, but you’re not really shredded.

“We’ve learned a lot more about our bodies since then, Hamilton says, which means our workouts today are more focused and challenging. Not to mention that we tend to take a more holistic and balanced approach to wellness. “After those aerobic sessions, everyone would like to take a cigarette break,” she says. Here, in Erewhon’s time, we do things a little differently.

Rose Byrne in Physical, 2021.Katrina Marcinowski / Courtesy of Apple TV +

But aerobic dance can be increased or decreased depending on your level of fitness, which made them accessible in an era when the only other fitness options were Muscle Beach and Gold’s Gym. This appeal was especially strong for women, who didn’t have a lot of fitness offerings to turn to at the time. Aaron Valdez, a videographer and collector who curates retro workout videos, explains that dance aerobics evolved directly from female-dominated dance studios. He has seen more “male” workout videos consisting of strength exercises and bodyweight movements rather than dance steps. “When aerobic training is included, it’s often in other sports like boxing, karate or cross training,” he says. And the language around them is different: Buzzwords like “conditioning”, “agility”, “power” and “mass” appear in the same places that aerobic dance marketing puts “burn fat”, “sculpt”. “And” tone “.


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